Any tips/information submitted, posted, or contained in this website is for general information purposes only.

We make no representations, completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability, or warranties of any kind.

Any reliance you place on such information contained on the website is strictly at your own risk. Further research is recommended.

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Rusty Nuts/Bolts

        Removal

Machinist's Workshop Magazine recently published some information on various penetrating oils. The magazine reports they tested penetrates for break out torque on rusted nuts.They are below. They arranged a subjective test of all the popular penetrates with the control being the torque required to remove the nut from a "scientifically rusted" environment.

 

Penetrating oils ........... Average torque load to loosen

 

No Oil used ................... 516 pounds

WD-40 ..................... ... 238 pounds

PB Blaster .................... 214 pounds

Liquid Wrench ...............127 pounds

Kano Kroil .................... 106 pounds

ATF*-Acetone mix............53 pounds

 

The ATF-Acetone mix is a "home brew" mix of 50 - 50 automatic transmission fluid and acetone. Note this "home brew" released bolts better than any commercial product in this one particular test.

 

ATF-Acetone mix is best, but you can also use ATF and lacquer thinner in a 50-50 mix.

 

*ATF=Automatic Transmission Fluid.

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Brake Fluid Info:

ClassicTube

WHICH BRAKE FLUIDS?   The marketplace is inundated with different types of brake fluid. Which should you use and why? The most common brake fluid is DOT 3, which is glycol-based. The Department of Transportation (DOT) number indicates the brake-fluid boiling point. Under pressure, brake fluid gets hot. Slam on the brakes or brake hard continuously and brake fluid temperature skyrockets. DOT 3 means the brake-fluid has trouble when there's 3 percent water in the fluid. This is known as the fluid's minimum boiling point.

Theoretically, brake fluid comes out of the bottle with 0-percent moisture, which means a boiling point no lower than 401 degrees F. Some fluids perform in a range from 460-500-degrees boiling point. For each percent of moisture absorbed, the fluid's boiling point drops 50 degrees. That means brake fluid heavily occupied by moisture will boil when you brake hard, creating air pockets and a spongy pedal, commonly known as vapor lock.

DOT 4 brake fluid, which can be mixed with DOT 3, raises the brake fluid's minimum boiling point to 446 degrees F. It adds borate esters to the DOT 3 glycol fluid to improve fluid properties and raise the boiling point. DOT 4 is more of a late-model automobile brake fluid, but you can use it in classics as well. You can mix it with existing DOT 3 fluid, or you can use it after a major brake overhaul. We suggest completely flushing and bleeding your system with DOT 4 if you're going to change over. Although DOT 3 and DOT 4 are compatible, it makes more sense to have one type in the system.

So what are the advantages of DOT 3 and DOT 4 brake fluids? These fluids offer better braking quality than DOT 5 silicone. Properly bled and serviced, DOT 3 and DOT 4 feel better when you apply the brakes. The downside to mineral-based fluids is the moisture they absorb, not to mention the damage they can do to paint if you happen to spill any.

DOT 5 silicone brake fluid can't be mixed with DOT 3 and DOT 4 fluids. You have to completely flush your system, and ideally, begin with fresh hydraulic components. We suggest fresh calipers, wheel cylinders, and master cylinder because silicone fluid could shock the rubber seals, which have grown accustomed to glycol-based fluids. DOT 5 silicone brake fluid is popular with racers because it has a very high boiling point of 700 degrees F. It's more stable than glycol-based fluids, and it's non-hygroscopic, which means it doesn't absorb moisture, and it won't damage paint.

The downside to DOT 5 silicone brake fluid is a spongy feel in the brake pedal because the fluid is compressible. It has the tendency to make air bubbles during servicing, which means you have to pour it slowly, and to form sludge when mixed with dirt particles. There's also zero compatibility with antilock braking systems and some boil issues with silicone brake-fluid additives. DOT 5 silicone brake fluid is not compatible with water, which only matters if there's any in the system. Water won't mix with silicone brake fluid, so it will remain separate and boil if fluid temperature hits 212 degrees F.

During normal driving, there's not much need to worry about moisture levels in the fluid. It's when we need our brakes badly that moisture in the system can be a problem.

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Engine Oil (zink)

Info, about having zinc is  taking out of motor oil. You can put in a ZDDP additive. (See the links below)

 

http://www.valvoline.com/faqs/motor-oil/racing-oil/iHHHH

 

http://classiccars.about.com/od/maintenancetips/a/Zddp-Debunking-The-Urban-Legend-This-Motor-Oil-Additive.htm

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How to look for a vacuum leak

By John Bellah

Insufficient intake manifold vacuum can be deadly to an internal-combustion engine. As a refresher, the intake stroke of an internal-combustion engine draws in a mixture of fuel and air from the carburetor at about a 13:1 ratio of air to gasoline. This creates a vacuum between the carburetor butterfly (or butterflies on a multi-throat carburetor) and the piston tops. Insufficient vacuum will reduce engine efficiency, causing a loss of power and fuel economy and rough operation, especially at idle. Prolonged vacuum leaks can eventually cause serious engine damage. There are many places vacuum can be lost, but with a few simple tools and diligent detective work, vacuum leaks can be cured for a sweet-running engine.

 

Leak check prep

Begin with a vacuum gauge and the vehicle’s shop or repair manual. The shop manual should specify how much manifold vacuum is specified for the vehicle’s engine. Also have access to simple hand tools in case the carburetor or manifold must be tightened. Also have access to standard or Vice Grip-brand pliers in case a hose must be temporarily blocked. A can of carburetor cleaner, an 18-inch length of 1/2-inch fuel hose and a couple of shop rags will also come in handy.

Before tackling any type of carburetion problem, the rest of the engine needs to be properly tuned. That means spark plugs and wires need to be checked, the points need to be set and operating properly and the timing — initial lead as well as vacuum and centrifugal advances — need to be properly set. If the engine has mechanical valve lifters (tappets), they must be properly adjusted as tight valves will eventually burn, causing a rough idle and low manifold vacuum. While the spark plugs are removed, a cylinder compression check will determine the condition of the valves and rings. If one has access to an ignition oscilloscope, that diagnostic tool can shortcut some of these operations. In stubborn cases, it may pay to have a knowledgeable technician scope-check the vehicle’s ignition system.

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Storage Tips

How to start a stored car (link)

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